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Stephen Petrey

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From Google:

Developer Tania Finlayson found her voice through Morse code. Now she’s partnering with Google to bring Morse code to Gboard, so others can try it for accessible communication.
 
Morse code for Gboard includes settings that allow users to customize the keyboard to their unique usage needs. It works in tandem with Android Accessibility features like Switch Access and Point Scan.

This is one of those rare product features and experiments that really should’ve been available from the beginning. This is a tool for software-level input via the Gboard Software Keyboard. An example of hardware-level input would be the Xbox Adaptive Controller which is host to 20 3.5mm inputs, USB ports, switches and touch interfaces. Which if one wanted to, could theoretically use together to type.

But anyone can use Morse Prediction on Gboard (see above), wether you have limited dexterity or not. There are two large touch areas to designate a dot or dash. I’m a little disappointed the predictive-word touch areas aren’t larger, but it’s a start. I suppose if you’re controlling this keyboard input with 3.5mm hardware, it wouldn’t really matter how large or small touch areas are. Perhaps even less so, if you’re using Switch Control/Switch Access.

This is really cool. I’m happy to see companies getting serious about accessibility. As a bonus, Google put together a really sweet, charming and fun web app to learn Morse Code

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